High School Suitors – Part 2

High School Suitors
Image provided by
Ariadna Bruna @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/50732422@N06/

As I had said in the first part of this series, I was hurt by Gary’s words. I put on a brave face the next day and went to school. I saw him in the hall in front of the library. I looked straight at him, smiled, and said, “Hi Gary.” He didn’t say anything back to me. Was he surprised by the way I handled the situation? Maybe. At the time, that’s exactly the reaction I wanted from him.

 

High School Suitors – Part 2
Image provided by
glee wiki @ http://glee.wikia.com/wiki/Sadie_Hawkins

That very afternoon in my band class (I played the flute.), I ask Dave to the Sadie Hawkins Dance that would be happening a week from that Saturday. Dave was sixteen but still a sophomore. He was still in the process of getting his driver’s license and only had a permit. His reason for not having his license was that he had a hard time getting his mom to take him to the motor vehicle department to take the written test. It sounded probable to me.

Dave was attentive, a little too attentive for my liking really. Because I still considered myself new to having a boyfriend in real life despite the three months with Gary, I along with most of his affection and only pushed him away gently when I thought he might be getting too wrapped up in it.

To get to the Sadie Hawkins Dance at our school, Dave, with his mom in tow picked me up. Yes, it was a strange situation. Because of the laws for drivers with permits in Colorado, I had to sit in the backseat of Dave’s VW. Yes, the car was his. He had mowed lawns for three years to come up with one-third of the cost for the car. His parents had said that they would pay the rest. Why didn’t we walk? It was December and the school was three miles away.

Gary was at that dance with someone I had known in elementary school. I avoided him. Showing him that I had a date for the dance seemed rather childish to me. I stayed close by Dave’s side and danced only with him.

There was a little diner across the street kitty corner from the school. Dave treated me to a hot fudge sundae and we talked a while. He told me about being held back a year in school when he was thirteen and how much trouble he had gotten into the year before. He felt that he had changed a lot since then, but as I saw him smoke his cigarette, I was pretty sure that he still had some growing up to do.

The Thursday after the dance, he called me asking me to a movie that next night. When I asked Mom, I found out that his grandmother knew Gary’s grandmother. Of course, because everyone involved went to the same denomination of church, Dave received the stamp of approval. How often does this happen in a city as large as the one I grew up in, namely Denver? Probably it has happened somewhere else but it’s got to be a rarity.

The movie he took me to is one that I truly believe all teenage couples were seeing over the span of about five years, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford. This time the pick-up was a little different. Dave had gotten his license. It was just him and me in his baby blue VW. After the movie, he took me to the restaurant next door. Again, I had the hot fudge sundae while he had a parfait. When we got to my house, he wanted to neck for a while. I let it go on for about five minutes; then told him I had to get inside before one of my parents showed up at the door.

At school, we hung out together when we had classes in the same hall. (The school was three stories with three halls per level.) That Wednesday he came to my house to see me. He had a definite purpose for his visit. He asked me to go steady with him.

(Is anyone jumping up and down with joy out there? If you are, please stop.)

Going steady was not what I wanted. I thought the notion was a silly teenage tradition. I didn’t need a ring or bracelet to keep me loyal to someone I was dating and I didn’t think the guy needed it either. I asked Dave if we could just agree not to go out with anyone else. He was hurt, of course. He liked the stupid tradition.

When he got to his house, he called up my friend, Debbie, and asked her out. How did I know? Debbie called and told me right after her conversation with Dave. Debbie had accepted the date. I was a little miffed because I thought she should have checked with me about Dave’s and my status before accepting. Although Debbie and I remained friends, the closeness had been broken between us.

The odd thing about Dave and I was that after approximately three weeks, we were friends. Moreover, we became close friends by the time school ended at the beginning of that next summer. There were things that I discussed with him that I didn’t dare discuss with my girlfriends.

Although I haven’t seen him for decades, I still treasure his friendship.

 

Have you ever had a friendship like this?

 

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22 Replies to “High School Suitors – Part 2”

        1. Thank you, Colleen. I did poorly on my About page. I just couldn’t wrap myself around writing so much about me at one time, and especially the good things. I really don’t have a lot to say about my so-called good qualities. Doing things like this in a post is much easier for me. 😉

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          1. Interesting….I just got done writing about we need to be able to recognize our strengths. 😉 But baby steps are just as important. A little bit of recognition at a time. 😉

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  1. I like this story. I don’t know how I missed the first part. Funny, I had a light blue VW bug to drive in high school. It was a 1961 model, and my dad bought it used in 1965. I drove it for years, and actually watched the odometer turn over the 200,000 mile mark. I had one boyfriend in high school. I was a senior, and he broke my heart. It took me years to date again, and the damage it did to my self esteem took even longer. Well, I’m still working on it today. We didn’t remain friends, and I never saw him after graduation. He committed suicide a few years back. He was a tortured soul, and I knew it back then.

    The only friendship I’ve had like you are discussing is the one I have with my husband.

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    1. My husband is my best friend now, has been since we got engaged way back in 1990.

      Sorry you got your heart broken. That’s terrible. I didn’t feel serious about any of the boys I dated in high school. I didn’t want to. I had plans for after high school and getting serious before I had a chance to do those things wasn’t something I even wanted to think about. As it turned out, I wasn’t able to do those things anyway, yet I’m still glad I didn’t get hooked on one of those boys.

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  2. Your story thru me back to that time when all was about school and boys. I had a crush on a boy who didn’t seen to notice me at all. I was pretty shy so I may not have been very upfront about my interest. It was years later that I learned he wanted to ask me out but wasn’t sure I liked him, and wasn’t able to take the risk. I just goes to show how perceptions can be a challenge. 🙂

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    1. That’s too bad that both of you couldn’t take that leap of faith back then. It happens all the time though. I guess I had more than my share of self-confidence because if I liked a guy, I was making him a friend of mind in hopes that he might ask me out. Usually this strategy worked, and when I didn’t, I still had the guy as a friend.

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  3. Reading your story brings back memories. Sometimes I am amazed and at others not so much. I didn’t date in high school, not until I began working. I was always attracted to the bad boys. It’s a wonder because I was afraid of my own shadow and always the wall flower. 😀

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    1. Some girls didn’t date. For some, it was because they were too shy, and with others, they just weren’t interested in the social stuff yet.

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying my posts. It makes it all worthwhile. 🙂

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    1. Most did end up as friends for me, but as you said, not close friends. Dave is the only one who I became so close to. We ended up leaning on each other a lot. I’m so glad he was there for me.

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  4. The story breaks my heart just a little bit, Glynis. But not in a horrible way. The whole world of being a teenager is so beautiful and so challenging and so in need of a giant nap, a bucket of Hagan Daz and an eraser at times.
    It’s good to go back and remember. Especially good to remember how much ice cream we could eat without it making any difference to our waistlines. 🙂
    Look forward to part 3!

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