Blog versus Novel Project

Blog verses Novel Project
Image provided by
Seth Sawyer @ https://www.flickr.com/photos/sidewalk_flying/

There isn’t much that goes on in my life these days. This is especially true if you compare it to how it was before I married for the second time. These days my life is filled with doing household chores, reading, watching TV, and, of course, writing. The only deadlines I have are the ones I impose on myself.

Before I decided to take a serious crack at writing a novel, I was writing posts for another blog I used to have five days a weeks and sometimes six. Consider yourself fortunate to not be able to read that blog (I took it down). You’d be appalled at the grammatic and spelling errors in each post. I had yet to find Grammarly and my skill with self-editing was atrocious back then.

It’s been just a month over a year since I took the plunge of trying to write a full-blown book. I’m not as far along on my journey as I’d like to be though. I would love to blame my lack of progress on the various circumstances I’ve found myself in during this past twelve months, but that would be a cop-out. This is especially true because I’ve had this writing urge in me for a long time, yet until last year, I’ve let it sit dormant rattling in my brain during the dead of night.

When I first started blogging back in 2005 (or was it early 2006?) at LiveJournal, I thought this might stop the sudden bolts of wakefulness at night when I have writing ideas. And it did work for a while.

When the wakefulness came back, I headed to sites like Associated Content (became Yahoo! Voices that is now closed) and Helium to write articles. I completely forgot about these sites when I was forced, by circumstances, to be off-line for a year. I really should go back to Helium to see if what I want to write still has a category over there.

During this past year, the tug between blogging and story writing have pulled and pushed at me almost constantly. Blogging gives me the freedom to write whatever is in my head at any given time. It’s my way of swabbing the decks of my mind, to clean off the debris. Still, the passion to get a whole story down lies within me. Being a real nag, in fact.

How am I supposed to juggle both? I thought cutting down to two posts a week would do the trick. Yet, as I work on my novel project, I find my mind slipping to the realm of the blog, trying to think of another topic to write about or to take a different angle on a subject I’ve written about before. Furthermore, when writing a post, I feel my mind trying to switch over to the story, thinking of what should come next, what I’ve forgotten in a previous scene, and the struggles of connecting scenes. What a mess!

I still think I should be able to do two posts a week. Maybe I need to make one of them just an update of what I’ve been doing with my writing during the week. That isn’t as mind-boggling as a whole new topic or a new angle on a subject. That way, maybe—just maybe—when I’m working on the novel, my mind with stay focused.

 

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15 Replies to “Blog versus Novel Project”

  1. A lot of writer/bloggers do that, Glynis–post a weekly update. Medeia Sharif does and I always love them. When you’re a writer, it’s fascinating to see how others juggle their projects.

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  2. It’s incredibly difficult to find a happy balance, it is something I am slightly struggling with too. I had a quick look on live journal, but it’s the sort of place I can become embroiled in. What is the difference between live journal and blogging?

    I think the sound of a weekly update sounds good and maybe a story’s on another day. I don’t have any preference for days. I find on my blog, some days are better than others for posting, I guess it largely depends on who follows

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    1. There isn’t really any difference between a blog and a journal when online. Of course, off-line there is no blogs. LiveJournal was one of the first sites to appear, giving a place for people to write extensively about whatever. They just chose to use the word journal because the word blog wasn’t popular yet.

      Chances are most of my mid-week posts will be stories or essays. As for switching from Tuesday to Wednesday, it’s a personal choice. I have this tendency to think of what should be in my project during the weekend. Having Monday to start developing those thoughts will help. Tuesday will be the day to write for the blog and schedule the post for the next day.

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      1. I always think it is best to go with your own flow. It’s only recently that I started to write more than 1 post each week. There are a few more due to the 101 course, but I will probably go back to the 2 per week, maybe three if I have something to ‘rabbit’ on about. I don’t think readers hold it against us if we’re a little quieter some weeks. But, I agree, when we are writing like you are doing, it is important to have a structured routine. Sometimes that takes a little tweaking around and it always involves heaps of self-discipline.

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  3. I think the fact that your head is swirling with ideas and you’ve a desperate need to write is one of the most important factors. By all means, use whatever avenues you have available to experiment and find where the muse calls most loudly from. The more you write, the better a writer you become. And an update may not only resonate with your readers, but also may help organize your ideas.
    I say go for it if it feels right to you, Glynis.

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  4. I was much better off when I went down to one post a week, but when life throws a monkey wrench or two into the mix, I don’t sweat it anymore and just don’t post. I’m taking a break from my dang novel once again and have been journaling. More and more the pull of nonfiction speaks to me…

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    1. I do feel calmer now that this decision is made. My ‘novel’ is real life embellished. This way I don’t have to dream up what will come next. It’s decided for me.

      What type of nonfiction do you want to do?

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